As part of my Lenten journey this year, I will be blogging daily using the themes or words created by the South-Central Synod of Wisconsin in partnership with other ELCA synods for “Lent Photo a Day.” The word for today, March 6th, is “Help.”

The psalms are filled with cries for help and songs of pleading for deliverance. Here are just four examples, three from the psalmist and one from the Lord:

Help us, O God our Savior, for the glory of your name; deliver us and forgive us our sins, for your name’s sake.” – Psalm 79:9. 

Help me, O Lord my God; save me according to your steadfast love.” – Psalm 109:26.

“I lift up my eyes to the hills; from where is my help to come?” – Psalm 121:1. 

“‘Because the needy are oppressed, and the poor cry out in misery, I will rise up,’ says the Lord, ‘and I will give them the help they long for.'” – Psalm 12:5.  

As I think about what it means to help, I am struck by how much we all need help. These verses above illustrate just some of the ways we need God’s help. We can’t deliver ourselves. We can’t forgive our own sins. We can’t save ourselves. And often, we really can’t save ourselves from ourselves.

From where shall my help come?

olympics
On a cloudy day on the afternoon after I was consecrated as a deacon in Poulsbo, the Olympic Mountains are starting to break through the clouds.

Inspired by Psalm 121, I have always thought of this passage with the images I had growing up, going to school and being able to see the beauty of the Olympic Mountains in one direction, and often Mount Rainier in a different direction. I guess that might be the benefit of having grown up in Washington state where there aren’t just hills, but mountains.

Perhaps the illustration lacks effect in places without mountains, but hopefully it illustrates the notion of seeing something grand, majestic, and bigger than ourselves. At the same time, this bigger and majestic hill or mountain, can be daunting or frightening to climb or travel across, only possible through God’s help or deliverance.

In what ways are you feeling that you, or others you know, need help right now?

rainier
Mount Rainier as I saw it from my plane last fall on a flight from Seattle to Omaha.

When we come together as people, we can do a lot of good to help one another as God calls us to do.

But when close ourselves off from community, build walls and hide behind them, and when we turn our back on our neighbors in need, we are the ones really needing help. For we have lost sight of why we are here and why God has created us.

For all those in need, our selves included, let us pray this prayer from Martin Luther,

Behold, Lord, an empty vessel that needs to be filled. My Lord, fill it. I am weak in the faith; strengthen me. I am cold in love; warm me and make me fervent, that my love may go out to my neighbor. I do not have a strong and firm faith; at times I doubt and am unable to trust you altogether. O Lord, help me. Strengthen my faith and trust in you. In you I have sealed the treasure of all I have. I am poor; you are rich and came to be merciful to the poor. I am a sinner; you are upright. With me, there is an abundance of sin; in you is the fullness of righteousness. Therefore I will remain with you, of whom I can receive, but to whom I may not give. Amen. 

As we continue together our journey through Lent to the cross, join me in pondering these questions, and join the #LentPhotoaDay adventure through images and pictures on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media channels. 

Source: “A prayer from Martin Luther,” found in Evangelical Lutheran Worship, (Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2006), page 87.

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