When you log into Facebook, and it reminds you that today is your Baptismal birthday, I have to admit, that’s kind of cool. It’s little strange, given that Facebook wasn’t around then, but still, it’s kind of cool. 

This has me thinking today about the importance of names and the idea of being claimed. Those of you who know me well, know that I prefer going by my full first name, Timothy. Today, in celebration of my baptismal birthday, I would like to share a few reasons why this matters for me.

baptismalbday
Baptized by my grandpa on Easter Sunday, and in this picture, with two young and amazing parents.

My baptized and given name
On this day a few decades ago, I was baptized on Easter Sunday and officially marked and claimed as a Child of God. I was sealed with the cross of Christ forever. I was named Timothy when I was born, and a couple months later, I was baptized as Timothy.

I was named after the companion, disciple, assistant, and perhaps correspondent to the Apostle Paul. I also like the supposed meaning for the name of Timothy, which is “honoring God.”

I wanted to be different
This name also matters to me because growing up, there were a number of Tim’s in my classes. Most of them were my friends.

The show “Home Improvement,” with Tim Allen playing “Tim the Tool Man Taylor,” was on TV every week when I was in elementary school, and the idea of being called “Tim,” like the sometimes odd and goofball “Tim the Tool Man,” was not quite what I wanted to be known for. And, to be perfectly honest, if you remember Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, you might also remember “Tiny Tim.” Being that I was always one of the shortest kids in my class, I didn’t want to be known as “Tiny Tim.” I wanted to be different.

I wanted to be different, so I did the best I could to claim that, by going by Timothy.

The realities of other names
It really wasn’t until the fourth grade when this effort of mine was challenged, and one of my favorite teachers started always calling me “Tim.” Perhaps I was just too quiet to fight it publicly or correct it? But my silent form of protest was to always write my name on my homework as “Timothy,” and to always sign my name as “Timothy.”

People near and far have called me one thing or another, too many names to willingly list. When called these different names I may or may not verbally respond, but when asked about my name preference, I always say my name is Timothy (but I am used to being called other things).

There may be other titles I am called, such as “friend,” “deacon,” “Child of God,” “brother,” “son,” “husband,” etc., and these are all well and good. But when you get past the title, my name will always be Timothy.

Names and identities matter
So why am I writing about this today on my baptismal birthday? I am not writing to make anyone feel bad who has called me something else. I get it, I have called plenty of people names they probably don’t want to be called too.

I am writing about this today because I believe names and identities matter. Timothy was the name I was given, and frankly, I am pretty fond of it. And it is for this reason, that I try whenever possible to ask someone what they prefer to be called. I have been on the other side, and have been called all sorts of odd names- some logical and some not.

mynameis
What is your name? And why does it matter to you?

If you have ever wondered, that’s what’s in a name for me.

What’s in your name that matters to you? Why is it important to you? How is it part of your identity and story?

Image Credit: Hello My Name is

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